Skip to Content

Agregador de orígenes de noticias

KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): Otro vídeo de Plasma Next, el futuro de KDE

Planet KDE Español - Sáb, 07/05/2014 - 19:01

Llevamos mucho tiempo en el blog hablando de Plasma Next, el futuro de KDE que promete seguir avanzando en el desarrollo del escritorio libre más completo del mercado. Ya os he podido enseñar algún vídeo que muestra algunas de sus funcionalidades, hoy os presento otro. Otro vídeo de Plasma Next, el futuro de KDE El [&hellip

KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): Proyecto GSoC para Kanagram 2014

Planet KDE Español - Sáb, 07/05/2014 - 11:31

Hay muchas aplicaciones KDE que se benefician del  programa Google Summner of Code (GSoC)  basta recordar las iniciativas para KDE Telepathy o el globo terráquero virtual Marble, cuyas iniciativas han aparecido en el blog. Hoy toca comentar una de KDE Edu: Kanagram. ¿Què es Kanagram? Kanagram, fue el sustituto de KMessedWords, que apareció como una [&hellip

KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): 20 formas de colaborar con KDE (y el Software Libre)

Planet KDE Español - Vie, 07/04/2014 - 16:57

Hace mucho tiempo realicé un artículo sobre 10 formas de colaborar con KDE (y el Software Libre en General) en el que comentaba las bondades de los proyectos libres, especialmente el  altruismo (conducta humana basada en la preocupación o atención desinteresada por el otro o los otros). Un tiempo después volví a la carga con [&hellip

KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): Disponible Marble para Windows

Planet KDE Español - Jue, 07/03/2014 - 11:13

Si hay una aplicación espectacular en KDE Edu para la asignatura de geografía ésta es Marble, el globo terràqueo virtual que nunca deja de sorprendernos. Marble ya está disponible para su versión Windows, lo cual es una muy buena noticia. Disponible Marble para Windows Ya está disponible la versión 1.8.3 de Marble para Windows, lo [&hellip

Where KDE is going - Part 2

KDE News - Mié, 07/02/2014 - 06:29

This is the second half of the 'where KDE is going' write-up. Last week, I discussed what is happening with KDE's technologies: Platform is turning modular in Frameworks, Plasma is moving to new technologies and the Applications change their release schedule. In this post, I will discuss the social and organizational aspects: our governance.

KDE e.V.

You can't talk about KDE and governance without bringing up KDE e.V. (eingetragener Verein or, in English, registered association). This Germany-based non-profit is the legal organization behind the KDE community, and it plays several important roles.

Initially set up to handle funding for KDE's conferences, the e.V. still has the organization of events as a major task. But that is no longer limited to the yearly Akademy conference. There are now events all over the world, from Camp KDE and Lakademy in the Americas to conf.kde.in in India. In addition, many Developer Sprints, usually with about 5-15 people, are supported, as are the annual Randa Meetings which can attract 40-60 developers.

KDE e.V. also provides legal services, pays for infrastructure and takes care of our trademarks. The KDE Free Qt Foundation is equally represented by KDE and Digia. The Foundation was set up between the former Trolltech and KDE to maintain Qt's open status, and has been continued with Nokia and Digia, the successive holders of the Qt trademark. KDE e.V. is not the guardian of technical decisions, however. This is up to the natural community development processes.

Change

But KDE e.V. does act as an agent of change. It provides a place where core KDE contributors come together and discuss a wide variety of subjects.


We created the KDE Manifesto

In the last 8 years or so, KDE e.V. has been the major driver behind increasing the number of developer sprints and has created the Fiduciary Licensing Agreement which allows it to re-license KDE code when needed, while protecting developers’ interests. The Code of Conduct originated with KDE e.V., as did our Community Working Group which helps deal with communication issues in the community.

A recent example of our ongoing improvement efforts is the KDE Manifesto. This has been for a very long time coming but Kévin Ottens got it to the finish line.

The Manifesto explicitly defines our community: our values and our commitments to each other. The importance of this can hardly be overstated – knowing who you are and what you want helps you make decisions but also shows others what you are about. The Manifesto made plain what was involved in being part of the KDE Community, including the benefits and the ways we operate.

Joining the KDE community

Since the Manifesto was written, several projects have joined KDE or begun the process of doing so:

  • KBibTex (a bibtex editor)
  • QtCurve (theme/style)
  • Kdenlive (non-linear video editor)
  • Tupi (2d animation tool)
  • GCompris (an educational application, former GNOME project - progress)
  • The wikiFM project, an Italian university-based knowledge database
  • Bodega (digital content store)
  • Kxstitch (cross stitch patterns and charts)
  • Trojita (a Qt IMAP mail client)

It is clear that these projects contribute to the growing diversity in the KDE community. The many projects joining us has prompted some refinement of the KDE Incubator, an effort to document the process of becoming part of the KDE community (also started by Kévin, who probably felt sorry for the fallout of his manifesto creating so much extra work ;-)).

Other projects have moved on, or emerged from the KDE community and have become independent communities. Examples are Necessitas (provides Qt-on-Android) and Ministro (installer for libraries on Android) but also the well-known ownCloud project which was announced at Camp KDE 2010 in San Diego and still has many KDE folks involved in it.

Growing Qt'er

KDE has grown – and so has Qt (pronounced 'cute'). The Qt ecosystem today is very big – it is estimated that there are half a million Qt developers world wide! And not only has Qt usage grown, but so has the ecosystem around it, with more and more contributions from more and more companies, communities and individuals. Including KDE.

KDE has always been close to the Qt community, with many KDE developers working for former Trolltech, now Digia, or in one of the companies providing Qt consulting. KDE played a major role in establishing the KDE Free Qt Foundation, and KDE people were critical to the process of creating Open Governance within the Qt Project in 2011. In 2013, the Qt Contributor Summit was co-located with Akademy, and as discussed in the previous article, KDE is contributing a lot of code to Qt and building closer bonds with the Qt ecosystem through our Frameworks 5 efforts.

Extrapolating change

Based on the above, one could extrapolate. More projects will join the KDE Community, and KDE will become more diverse. KDE is also working on formalizing the relationships with external entities through a community partnership program. This will allow KDE e.V. to work closer with other communities in legal and financial matters and share KDE’s strengths with them. With these changes, the community shows a desire to expand its scope.


The Join the Game program looked for 500 KDE supporters

Another area where change might take place is in the financial area. KDE e.V. does not have the mandate to define technical directions. To sponsor a developer, the Krita team set up the Dutch Krita Foundation to handle the funds. Currently, Krita, Free Software's most successful and powerful drawing application, is running a Kickstarter campaign to obtain funding for several developers with the aim of bringing the upcoming Krita 2.9 release to a new level. In other cases, external organizations supported developers working on KDE code, like Kolabsys supporting several developers on the KDE PIM suite (like Christian), and of course the various Linux Distributions (like Red Hat) which have made massive improvements to KDE possible over the years.

Paid development is a complicated topic, as most KDE contributors volunteer their time. Money can be damaging to such intrinsic motivation. At the same time, some tasks are just no fun – paid developers can perhaps help. Some people in the community feel that KDE e.V. (or perhaps another organization?) could play a more active role in raising funds for certain projects, for example. The Randa Meetings fundraiser 2 years ago might be a sign of things to come, and again we've started a fundraiser to make Randa 2014 as successful as the earlier meetings: Please support it!

There may be more sustaining membership programs such as 'Join the Game' in the future, and suggestions, ideas and practical help in obtaining and using funds for KDE development are very much welcome.

Not all change

But in all this change, it is crucial that the KDE community preserves what makes it work well. KDE has gotten where it is today by the culture and practices of today (see some of my thoughts on this). Like in any community, these are hidden rules that allow KDE to pool the knowledge of so many brilliant people, and without too much politics, to make the best decisions possible. The KDE culture, so to say. This includes well known Free Software soft rules like Who Codes, Decides, RTFM, Talk is Cheap and Just Do It but also very 'KDE' rules like Assume Good Intentions and Respect the Elders. And just like in the French Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité, the rules are inseparable and interdependent. They are what makes KDE such an amazing place, full of creativity, innovation and fun.

Of course, in other areas, it can hamper progress or block people from making changes as quickly as they like. All culture has good and bad aspects, and we should stay flexible to adapt to changes and fix shortcomings. This is a slow process, often counted in years, rather than months - putting off some people who wish things went a little faster. But change happens.

Change to keep things healthy

The KDE Community Working Group is an institution with the goal of preserving positive aspects of our culture. The CWG consists of a group of trusted community members dealing with conflicts and social issues. It has been around since 2008 and has recently been given the ability to deal with 'stormy day' scenarios – they will now handle situations where somebody is persistently behaving contrary to the culture. Luckily such situations are extremely rare but it is good to have a process in place to deal with them.

The kde-community mailing list has moved many discussions into an open forum that used to be limited to KDE e.V. members. Opening up our internal discussions is more inclusive; it preserves the open nature of our project in the face of growth and change.

Meta change

Putting these changes together, a pattern starts to emerge:
The Manifesto has defined what we have become and what we want. It has brought in other people and other projects. We open up our community, formalize community management. KDE e.V. wants to collaborate more with other organizations, Frameworks 5 brings KDE technology to a wider audience, and we're bringing our desktop and application technology to more and more devices.

I think KDE is going meta.

KDE is becoming a meta organization. Perhaps you can call it an Eclipse for GUI or end user software, bringing a wide variety of projects together under one umbrella. The challenge for the KDE community is to guide these changes, keep good practices and develop new ones that fit the new world!

Conclusion

KDE is becoming a umbrella-community, a community of communities. A place where people with a huge variety of interests and ideas come together, sharing a common vision about the world. Not a technical vision, mind you, but a vision about HOW to do things. Shared values are what brings us together. And with KDE going meta, there is more room for everybody!

These articles are based on a talk given at conf.kde.in by Jos Poortvliet with lots of input from KDE contributors. A more extensive version of these articles, quoting members of the KDE community for more background, can be found in the upcoming September issue of Linux Voice magazine, 'the magazine that gives back to the Free Software community'

Dot Categories:

Where KDE is going - Part 2

KDE News - Mié, 07/02/2014 - 06:29

This is the second half of the 'where KDE is going' write-up. Last week, I discussed what is happening with KDE's technologies: Platform is turning modular in Frameworks, Plasma is moving to new technologies and the Applications change their release schedule. In this post, I will discuss the social and organizational aspects: our governance.

KDE e.V.

You can't talk about KDE and governance without bringing up KDE e.V. (eingetragener Verein or, in English, registered association). This Germany-based non-profit is the legal organization behind the KDE community, and it plays several important roles.

Initially set up to handle funding for KDE's conferences, the e.V. still has the organization of events as a major task. But that is no longer limited to the yearly Akademy conference. There are now events all over the world, from Camp KDE and Lakademy in the Americas to conf.kde.in in India. In addition, many Developer Sprints, usually with about 5-15 people, are supported, as are the annual Randa Meetings which can attract 40-60 developers.

KDE e.V. also provides legal services, pays for infrastructure and takes care of our trademarks. The KDE Free Qt Foundation is equally represented by KDE and Digia. The Foundation was set up between the former Trolltech and KDE to maintain Qt's open status, and has been continued with Nokia and Digia, the successive holders of the Qt trademark. KDE e.V. is not the guardian of technical decisions, however. This is up to the natural community development processes.

Change

But KDE e.V. does act as an agent of change. It provides a place where core KDE contributors come together and discuss a wide variety of subjects.


We created the KDE Manifesto

In the last 8 years or so, KDE e.V. has been the major driver behind increasing the number of developer sprints and has created the Fiduciary Licensing Agreement which allows it to re-license KDE code when needed, while protecting developers’ interests. The Code of Conduct originated with KDE e.V., as did our Community Working Group which helps deal with communication issues in the community.

A recent example of our ongoing improvement efforts is the KDE Manifesto. This has been for a very long time coming but Kévin Ottens got it to the finish line.

The Manifesto explicitly defines our community: our values and our commitments to each other. The importance of this can hardly be overstated – knowing who you are and what you want helps you make decisions but also shows others what you are about. The Manifesto made plain what was involved in being part of the KDE Community, including the benefits and the ways we operate.

Joining the KDE community

Since the Manifesto was written, several projects have joined KDE or begun the process of doing so:

  • KBibTex (a bibtex editor)
  • QtCurve (theme/style)
  • Kdenlive (non-linear video editor)
  • Tupi (2d animation tool)
  • GCompris (an educational application, former GNOME project - progress)
  • The wikiFM project, an Italian university-based knowledge database
  • Bodega (digital content store)
  • Kxstitch (cross stitch patterns and charts)
  • Trojita (a Qt IMAP mail client)

It is clear that these projects contribute to the growing diversity in the KDE community. The many projects joining us has prompted some refinement of the KDE Incubator, an effort to document the process of becoming part of the KDE community (also started by Kévin, who probably felt sorry for the fallout of his manifesto creating so much extra work ;-)).

Other projects have moved on, or emerged from the KDE community and have become independent communities. Examples are Necessitas (provides Qt-on-Android) and Ministro (installer for libraries on Android) but also the well-known ownCloud project which was announced at Camp KDE 2010 in San Diego and still has many KDE folks involved in it.

Growing Qt'er

KDE has grown – and so has Qt (pronounced 'cute'). The Qt ecosystem today is very big – it is estimated that there are half a million Qt developers world wide! And not only has Qt usage grown, but so has the ecosystem around it, with more and more contributions from more and more companies, communities and individuals. Including KDE.

KDE has always been close to the Qt community, with many KDE developers working for former Trolltech, now Digia, or in one of the companies providing Qt consulting. KDE played a major role in establishing the KDE Free Qt Foundation, and KDE people were critical to the process of creating Open Governance within the Qt Project in 2011. In 2013, the Qt Contributor Summit was co-located with Akademy, and as discussed in the previous article, KDE is contributing a lot of code to Qt and building closer bonds with the Qt ecosystem through our Frameworks 5 efforts.

Extrapolating change

Based on the above, one could extrapolate. More projects will join the KDE Community, and KDE will become more diverse. KDE is also working on formalizing the relationships with external entities through a community partnership program. This will allow KDE e.V. to work closer with other communities in legal and financial matters and share KDE’s strengths with them. With these changes, the community shows a desire to expand its scope.


The Join the Game program looked for 500 KDE supporters

Another area where change might take place is in the financial area. KDE e.V. does not have the mandate to define technical directions. To sponsor a developer, the Krita team set up the Dutch Krita Foundation to handle the funds. Currently, Krita, Free Software's most successful and powerful drawing application, is running a Kickstarter campaign to obtain funding for several developers with the aim of bringing the upcoming Krita 2.9 release to a new level. In other cases, external organizations supported developers working on KDE code, like Kolabsys supporting several developers on the KDE PIM suite (like Christian), and of course the various Linux Distributions (like Red Hat) which have made massive improvements to KDE possible over the years.

Paid development is a complicated topic, as most KDE contributors volunteer their time. Money can be damaging to such intrinsic motivation. At the same time, some tasks are just no fun – paid developers can perhaps help. Some people in the community feel that KDE e.V. (or perhaps another organization?) could play a more active role in raising funds for certain projects, for example. The Randa Meetings fundraiser 2 years ago might be a sign of things to come, and again we've started a fundraiser to make Randa 2014 as successful as the earlier meetings: Please support it!

There may be more sustaining membership programs such as 'Join the Game' in the future, and suggestions, ideas and practical help in obtaining and using funds for KDE development are very much welcome.

Not all change

But in all this change, it is crucial that the KDE community preserves what makes it work well. KDE has gotten where it is today by the culture and practices of today (see some of my thoughts on this). Like in any community, these are hidden rules that allow KDE to pool the knowledge of so many brilliant people, and without too much politics, to make the best decisions possible. The KDE culture, so to say. This includes well known Free Software soft rules like Who Codes, Decides, RTFM, Talk is Cheap and Just Do It but also very 'KDE' rules like Assume Good Intentions and Respect the Elders. And just like in the French Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité, the rules are inseparable and interdependent. They are what makes KDE such an amazing place, full of creativity, innovation and fun.

Of course, in other areas, it can hamper progress or block people from making changes as quickly as they like. All culture has good and bad aspects, and we should stay flexible to adapt to changes and fix shortcomings. This is a slow process, often counted in years, rather than months - putting off some people who wish things went a little faster. But change happens.

Change to keep things healthy

The KDE Community Working Group is an institution with the goal of preserving positive aspects of our culture. The CWG consists of a group of trusted community members dealing with conflicts and social issues. It has been around since 2008 and has recently been given the ability to deal with 'stormy day' scenarios – they will now handle situations where somebody is persistently behaving contrary to the culture. Luckily such situations are extremely rare but it is good to have a process in place to deal with them.

The kde-community mailing list has moved many discussions into an open forum that used to be limited to KDE e.V. members. Opening up our internal discussions is more inclusive; it preserves the open nature of our project in the face of growth and change.

Meta change

Putting these changes together, a pattern starts to emerge:
The Manifesto has defined what we have become and what we want. It has brought in other people and other projects. We open up our community, formalize community management. KDE e.V. wants to collaborate more with other organizations, Frameworks 5 brings KDE technology to a wider audience, and we're bringing our desktop and application technology to more and more devices.

I think KDE is going meta.

KDE is becoming a meta organization. Perhaps you can call it an Eclipse for GUI or end user software, bringing a wide variety of projects together under one umbrella. The challenge for the KDE community is to guide these changes, keep good practices and develop new ones that fit the new world!

Conclusion

KDE is becoming a umbrella-community, a community of communities. A place where people with a huge variety of interests and ideas come together, sharing a common vision about the world. Not a technical vision, mind you, but a vision about HOW to do things. Shared values are what brings us together. And with KDE going meta, there is more room for everybody!

These articles are based on a talk given at conf.kde.in by Jos Poortvliet with lots of input from KDE contributors. A more extensive version of these articles, quoting members of the KDE community for more background, can be found in the upcoming September issue of Linux Voice magazine, 'the magazine that gives back to the Free Software community'

Dot Categories:

KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): Lanzado KDE Connect 0.7, la magia continua

Planet KDE Español - Mié, 07/02/2014 - 04:18

Uno de los proyectos más interesantes de la Comunidad KDE sigue avanzando. A la espera de poder disfrutar de un entorno “comercial” KDE en nuestro smartphone debemos tener algún programa que simplifique la interacción con dispositivos Android, esta aplicación se llama KDE Connect. Lanzado KDE Connect El pasado 28 de junio Albert Vaca, creador de [&hellip

KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): Lanzado digiKam Software Collection 4.1

Planet KDE Español - Mar, 07/01/2014 - 10:07

Entre las aplicaciones más espectaculares que ofrece la Comunidad KDE nos encontramos con la aplicación para la gestión de fotografías digiKam, una verdadera maravilla que hará las delicias de los amantes de la fotografía y que están de anorabuena pues se acaba de lanzar la versión 4.1 de este magnífico software. ¿Qué es digiKam? La [&hellip

KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): Vídeo Netrunner 14: fondos animados KDE Dreamdesktop

Planet KDE Español - Lun, 06/30/2014 - 17:35

El pasado 22 de junio fue lanzado Netrunner 14, la última versión de una distribución peculiar de GNU/Linux, y que demuestra algo que ya comentamos en el blog: que se trata de una de las distribuciones con más futuro y realmente interesante. Hoy os traigo un vídeo que demuestra cómo descargar y activar KDE Dreamdesktop [&hellip

Akademy-es 2014: Great success in KDE's return to Málaga

KDE News - Lun, 06/30/2014 - 06:13

The ninth edition of Akademy-es was held last month in Málaga at the Telecommunications School of University of Málaga. Akademy-es had never been held in the city before but it is where the idea of Akademy-es began, during Akademy 2005, resulting in the first Akademy-es in 2006 in Barcelona. KDE old timer Antonio Larrosa is the link between both editions, being the local organizer of Akademy-es 2014 and Akademy 2005.

This year Akademy-es has continued its upwards trend in people registered, ending up with around 100 people. Talks as always have been varied, including philosophical talks about what KDE is, technical ones about how to use ASAN to debug your apps, practical ones on how to make your computer and your [Android] phone work better together, some programming with an introductory QtQuick talk (in English!), and much more.

Besides the serious talks there was always time for some socializing, an important part these kind of conferences.
Specially interesting was Saturday dinner at La Casa Invisible where we met a group of people that like KDE is investing lots of time in helping society for the greater good.

Finally, please join KDE España in thanking our sponsors Digia, Opentia, openSUSE and Wabobo for helping make Akademy-es 2014 possible.

Dot Categories:

Akademy-es 2014: Great success in KDE's return to Málaga

KDE News - Lun, 06/30/2014 - 06:13

The ninth edition of Akademy-es was held last month in Málaga at the Telecommunications School of University of Málaga. Akademy-es had never been held in the city before but it is where the idea of Akademy-es began, during Akademy 2005, resulting in the first Akademy-es in 2006 in Barcelona. KDE old timer Antonio Larrosa is the link between both editions, being the local organizer of Akademy-es 2014 and Akademy 2005.

This year Akademy-es has continued its upwards trend in people registered, ending up with around 100 people. Talks as always have been varied, including philosophical talks about what KDE is, technical ones about how to use ASAN to debug your apps, practical ones on how to make your computer and your [Android] phone work better together, some programming with an introductory QtQuick talk (in English!), and much more.

Besides the serious talks there was always time for some socializing, an important part these kind of conferences.
Specially interesting was Saturday dinner at La Casa Invisible where we met a group of people that like KDE is investing lots of time in helping society for the greater good.

Finally, please join KDE España in thanking our sponsors Digia, Opentia, openSUSE and Wabobo for helping make Akademy-es 2014 possible.

Dot Categories:

KDE Commit-Digest for 11th May 2014

KDE News - Lun, 06/30/2014 - 01:27

In this week's KDE Commit-Digest:

  • Clang backend of KDevelop gains basic implementation of adjust signature assistant
  • Kscreen KCM has been rewritten; the interface has two parts: a view with monitors that can be dragged around to reposition screens, and a widget-based part, that provides detailed configuration for each screen, like resolution, rotation, etc
  • The screen locker gets the KCM back too
  • Akonadi gets incremental changes for MERGE and tag support for MERGE and APPEND
  • KMyMoney supports SQLCipher database driver
  • Plasma Media Center prioritizes photos taken by a camera-like device.

Read the rest of the Digest here.

Dot Categories:

KDE Commit-Digest for 11th May 2014

KDE News - Lun, 06/30/2014 - 01:27

In this week's KDE Commit-Digest:

  • Clang backend of KDevelop gains basic implementation of adjust signature assistant
  • Kscreen KCM has been rewritten; the interface has two parts: a view with monitors that can be dragged around to reposition screens, and a widget-based part, that provides detailed configuration for each screen, like resolution, rotation, etc
  • The screen locker gets the KCM back too
  • Akonadi gets incremental changes for MERGE and tag support for MERGE and APPEND
  • KMyMoney supports SQLCipher database driver
  • Plasma Media Center prioritizes photos taken by a camera-like device.

Read the rest of the Digest here.

Dot Categories:

KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): Ganadores concurso fondo de pantalla Plasma Next

Planet KDE Español - Dom, 06/29/2014 - 10:34

Ya tenemos ganadores del concurso que debía elegir los fondos de pantalla que acompañaran al precioso wallpapaer oficial de Plasma Next, el cual ya hemos visto en infinidad de capturas y que encabeza el presente artículo. Ganadores concurso fondo de pantalla Plasma Next No ha sido fácil debido al buen nivel de los competidores pero [&hellip

KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): Colabora con el sprint de Randa 2014

Planet KDE Español - Sáb, 06/28/2014 - 10:07

Aunque ya se ha comentado en el blog no está de más recordarlo. Un año más Randa se perfila como una ciudad básica en el desarrollo de KDE ya que por quinta ocasión va a organizar una serie de Sprints para dar un impulso a diferentes grupos que forman la Comunidad KDE. Sprints de Randa [&hellip

Randa Meetings Interview Three: Vedant Agrawal

KDE News - Vie, 06/27/2014 - 06:28

Vedant Agarwala

Thanks again for your further support of the Randa Meetings fundraising. We have now reached almost 40% of the our goal and there is still time to go. Please help even more and spread the word. If we reach our goal we can have an even more stable Kdenlive, more applications ported to KDE Frameworks 5, further progress on Phonon, a look at Amarok 3, even better KDE educational applications, a finished port of GCompris to Qt and KDE technologies, an updated KDE Book, more work on Gluon and a new and amazing KDE SDK!

Here is another little snippet of the musings of a young student, Vedant Agarwala, from India who is doing his Google Summer of Code project with KDE this year.

Could you describe yourself in a few lines and tell us where you're from?

I am a Computer Science Engineer, currently in my final year of graduation from National Institute of Technology, Durgapur.

How did you first chance upon KDE? Could you describe your journey in short?

Towards the end of my first year in college I wanted to do some real world coding - code that actually had some meaning and that would be really useful to someone - as opposed to college assignments/evaluations - and so I had a talk with one of my college seniors who was a two-time Google Summer of Code student. He was a KDE developer and suggested I do the same. That was the beginning of my journey into Linux, Open Source and KDE. It has been uphill since and two years later; here I am; eagerly awaiting arrival at a KDE Sprint.

Could you describe your Google Summer of Code experience and GSoC project in short?

So far my GSoC experience is really nice. Some really busy times researching, coding, testing, debugging. I am improving the way lyrics are fetched and displayed in Amarok. Personally; I like to follow the lyrics of the song that is playing; so I added this idea to the Ideas Page for GSoC 2014. And now here I am, working on it. The goal of my project is to highlight the particular line from the entire lyrics text that is being played.
My ultimate goal is to add the features that I have promised. I hope I achieve it. Not only would it improve the Amarok experience, it would pave the way to developments in Amarok; like karaoke. I love karaoke (even though I am very bad at it). Though it is out of the scope of this project to implement a karaoke feature, implementing LRC support is halfway to karaoke.


Amarok - a powerful music player for Linux, Unix and Windows

Could you tell us how GSoC helps many students like you both in increasing their knowledge as well as in experience?

GSoC is a great program for us students who get paid for working on Free Software. A lot is learnt while writing code over a period of three months. It is different from bug fixes that take typically a week. Also, the mentorship and two evaluations by Google (on which the stipend depends) are great motivators.
Rather than spending time writing closed source code for companies (in internships), students can spend their summer vacation contributing to the world of Free Software.

Why is KDE so special to you?

KDE to me is freedom. I used windows before KDE software and I felt like a bird let out of a cage.

Is this your first time at Randa?

Yes it is my first time. To any KDE conference actually.

When did you first hear about the meetings in Randa and why do you wish to be a part of it?

I heard about this meeting in Randa from Myriam on IRC. I'd heard that she, Mark and other developers of Amarok and KDE were going to be there and so I thought that it would be a nice opportunity to meet them in person.

Which specific area of KDE Applications do you contribute to?

I work on Amarok - KDE's music player.

What is your specific role in the particular group of KDE Applications that you are a part of and how long have you been working?

I contribute code, do some code reviews, and fix bugs. I have been working on it for one and half years now.

Have you got anything in particular planned for Randa?

I have planned to talk about porting Amarok to Qt5 and talk with Amarok developers to decide what Amarok 3.0 will be like.

Why do you think meetings such as Randa are very important for KDE and for Free Software communities around the globe?

The contributors of Free Software do not receive any monetary perks for the work they do. Sponsored meetings like this is a nice incentive, especially for students.

Is this your first time to Switzerland? Are you excited about being in another country?

I went to Switzerland when I was 5 years old. I haven't been abroad after that. Those memories are a haze but I would love to re-live them this time.

Thanks a lot, Vedant, for your time for the interview and dedication to Amarok and the KDE community.

Please support us in the organization of the Randa Meetings 2014.

Dot Categories:

Randa Meetings Interview Three: Vedant Agrawal

KDE News - Vie, 06/27/2014 - 06:28

Vedant Agarwala

Thanks again for your further support of the Randa Meetings fundraising. We have now reached almost 40% of the our goal and there is still time to go. Please help even more and spread the word. If we reach our goal we can have an even more stable Kdenlive, more applications ported to KDE Frameworks 5, further progress on Phonon, a look at Amarok 3, even better KDE educational applications, a finished port of GCompris to Qt and KDE technologies, an updated KDE Book, more work on Gluon and a new and amazing KDE SDK!

Here is another little snippet of the musings of a young student, Vedant Agarwala, from India who is doing his Google Summer of Code project with KDE this year.

Could you describe yourself in a few lines and tell us where you're from?

I am a Computer Science Engineer, currently in my final year of graduation from National Institute of Technology, Durgapur.

How did you first chance upon KDE? Could you describe your journey in short?

Towards the end of my first year in college I wanted to do some real world coding - code that actually had some meaning and that would be really useful to someone - as opposed to college assignments/evaluations - and so I had a talk with one of my college seniors who was a two-time Google Summer of Code student. He was a KDE developer and suggested I do the same. That was the beginning of my journey into Linux, Open Source and KDE. It has been uphill since and two years later; here I am; eagerly awaiting arrival at a KDE Sprint.

Could you describe your Google Summer of Code experience and GSoC project in short?

So far my GSoC experience is really nice. Some really busy times researching, coding, testing, debugging. I am improving the way lyrics are fetched and displayed in Amarok. Personally; I like to follow the lyrics of the song that is playing; so I added this idea to the Ideas Page for GSoC 2014. And now here I am, working on it. The goal of my project is to highlight the particular line from the entire lyrics text that is being played.
My ultimate goal is to add the features that I have promised. I hope I achieve it. Not only would it improve the Amarok experience, it would pave the way to developments in Amarok; like karaoke. I love karaoke (even though I am very bad at it). Though it is out of the scope of this project to implement a karaoke feature, implementing LRC support is halfway to karaoke.


Amarok - a powerful music player for Linux, Unix and Windows

Could you tell us how GSoC helps many students like you both in increasing their knowledge as well as in experience?

GSoC is a great program for us students who get paid for working on Free Software. A lot is learnt while writing code over a period of three months. It is different from bug fixes that take typically a week. Also, the mentorship and two evaluations by Google (on which the stipend depends) are great motivators.
Rather than spending time writing closed source code for companies (in internships), students can spend their summer vacation contributing to the world of Free Software.

Why is KDE so special to you?

KDE to me is freedom. I used windows before KDE software and I felt like a bird let out of a cage.

Is this your first time at Randa?

Yes it is my first time. To any KDE conference actually.

When did you first hear about the meetings in Randa and why do you wish to be a part of it?

I heard about this meeting in Randa from Myriam on IRC. I'd heard that she, Mark and other developers of Amarok and KDE were going to be there and so I thought that it would be a nice opportunity to meet them in person.

Which specific area of KDE Applications do you contribute to?

I work on Amarok - KDE's music player.

What is your specific role in the particular group of KDE Applications that you are a part of and how long have you been working?

I contribute code, do some code reviews, and fix bugs. I have been working on it for one and half years now.

Have you got anything in particular planned for Randa?

I have planned to talk about porting Amarok to Qt5 and talk with Amarok developers to decide what Amarok 3.0 will be like.

Why do you think meetings such as Randa are very important for KDE and for Free Software communities around the globe?

The contributors of Free Software do not receive any monetary perks for the work they do. Sponsored meetings like this is a nice incentive, especially for students.

Is this your first time to Switzerland? Are you excited about being in another country?

I went to Switzerland when I was 5 years old. I haven't been abroad after that. Those memories are a haze but I would love to re-live them this time.

Thanks a lot, Vedant, for your time for the interview and dedication to Amarok and the KDE community.

Please support us in the organization of the Randa Meetings 2014.

Dot Categories:

KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): Lanzado Plasma Media Center 1.3

Planet KDE Español - Vie, 06/27/2014 - 02:06

El equipo de desarrolladores de Plasma Media Center (PCM) de KDE lanzó Plasma Media Center 1.2 justo antes de Navidad, 6 meses después lanza la siguiente versión: Plasma Media Center 1.3.   Plasma Media Center Para quienes no sepan, Plasma Media Center es un centro multimedia, es decir, una aplicación que aúna en una interfaz [&hellip

Christian Díez (Malcer): La suite artística Caledonia se prepara para Plasma Next

Planet KDE Español - Jue, 06/26/2014 - 22:08

Trabajo muy tedioso este de hacer y mantener artwork para un entorno de escritorio, todo sea dicho (a pesar de todas las satisfacciones y el hecho de que en este caso lo hago principalmente para consumo propio, a la par que aprovecho para difundirlo). Pero hay que evolucionar y adaptarse. Caledonia (no solo el tema plasma, sino toda la suite) se prepara para recibir a Plasma Next, y con motivo de todo esto se espera algo más grande de lo habitual.

El tema plasma, pieza clave de la suite, seguirá prácticamente como siempre a pesar de su compatibilidad con Workspaces 5 (su estilo lo merece, es lo suficientemente perfecto en general, sólo se retocarán detalles, iconos y colores), pero habrá algunos cambios en el KDM, el KSplash, la colección de wallpapers y la web del proyecto, todo ello para dar la bienvenida a una nueva época. La tendencia general de todo ello es a algo más colorista, complementando aún más al frío gris, blanco y negro que predominaba en toda la colección. La clave de todo ello es generar aún más contraste y por supuesto darle algo de color y alegría gracias a los detalles. Empecé con colores pastel, desaturados y oscuros, y últimamente en todo el artwork que estoy haciendo he experimentando con mucho color buscando un estilo propio, y por supuesto quiero reflejarlo, ampliando así la paleta de colores de la colección. Haciendo esto hago que Caledonia se refresque dentro de su línea, y ayuda a que no me aburra con todo esto. Creo que será una mezcla realmente genial e interesante si tenemos en cuenta la base e inspiración industrial y todo el diseño alemán que ha portado hasta ahora.

La web será mucho más sencilla, ligera y directa (le hace muchísima falta), además de que debería tener soporte para dispositivos móviles como smartphones y tablets (bastante fundamental hoy en día, aunque la suite esté enfocada al escritorio). El tema KDM debería ser el último si Plasma Next y el próximo KDE instaura definitivamente SDDM como login manager, y hablando de éste, tengo que hacer un tema SDDM para Caledonia si ocurre.

La colección de wallpapers sufrirá otra renovación: el plan es dejar de lado todos los fondos de pantalla con estilo y colores que ya no encajen, y además estaría muy bien que la colección entera fuese de mi propia creación. Es decir, mi idea es rechazar la colaboración con otros artistas y centarme en ofrecer mis propios trabajos para hacerlo aún más personal. Echaré muchísimo de menos las calidades ajenas, pero eso me ayudará a crear mejores obras ahora que creo que puedo aportar mucho en este aspecto, ya que me he centrado en colecciones bastante buenas, siempre aumentando la calidad (y aún hay ases bajo la manga…).

La imagen que ilustra este artículo es un perfecto ejemplo de cómo se verá. Todo lo que se muestra está dentro de los planes de dicha actualización. El wallpaper será presentado y liberado muy pronto de forma individual (aún estoy trabajando en él) pero es obvio que será escogido para la colección “caledoniana”. El tema plasma de Caledonia presenta algunos detalles nuevos como los botones multimedia o los colores del calendario. Y también podéis ver un icono oficial para el menú de aplicaciones, que a pesar de que será presentado también más adelante, ya está disponible desde hace algunas semanas en el repositorio de SourceForge (y con una buena cantidad de descargas sin haberlo anunciado, no me lo esperaba). El icono para los menús de aplicaciones busca ser genérico, intentando desplazar de una vez al logo de KDE (no es nada personal, es que sencillamente debería haber hecho algo así hace tiempo teniendo en cuenta todo el planteamiento de la suite).

Y hasta aquí este breve anuncio o como queramos llamarlo.


KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): Lanzado Linux Mint 17 Qiana KDE

Planet KDE Español - Jue, 06/26/2014 - 13:16

Recientemente fue lanzado Linux Mint 17 Qiana KDE, es decir, la versión definitiva de Linux Mint 17 en su versión escritorio KDE. Una gran noticia para todos los usaurios de distribuciones GNU/Linux ¿Quieres saber algo más de ella? Lanzado Linux Mint 17 Qiana KDE De esta forma, ya se ha llegado a la 17ª versión de [&hellip

Distribuir contenido