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KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): Disponible KaOS 2014.06, más bello y funcional

Planet KDE Español - Vie, 06/20/2014 - 05:10

Llegamos a la mitad del año y KaOs nos ofrece una nueva versión de su distribución, una excelente oportunidad para subirse al carro de esta particular distribución GNU/Linux. ¿Qué es KaOS? Describir KaOS es relativamente sencillo. Se trata de una distribución rolling release desarrollada por Anke Boersma,que tiene como finalidad sacar el máximo provecho a [&hellip

KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): Sigram el cliente de Telegram Qt para Linux

Planet KDE Español - Jue, 06/19/2014 - 11:27

Hace un tiempo os presenté Telegram, la alternativa libre de Whatsapp que prometía romper el dominio de la aplicación privativa. Después del boom inicial su fama pareció desvanecerse, pero nada más lejos de la realidad. Dado que Telegram es un proyecto libre, poco a poco se van conociendo proyectos alrededor de él. La mayor parte [&hellip

KDE e.V. Quarterly Report for Q4 2013

KDE News - Jue, 06/19/2014 - 06:01

The KDE e.V. Quarterly Report for the fourth quarter of 2013 features a brief note of all the activities and events carried out, supported and funded by KDE e.V in this span of time, as well as a short overview of the major events, conferences and mentoring programs. !ll of this in one document that you should not miss out on to know about almost everything that has been KDE in those four months!

Contents

The featured article covers all the students of GSoC 2013 with personal quotes and a first-hand note of their experiences and time and an overview of each student's project and contributions followed by another article covering the young participants of Google Code-in and the massive feats that school children achieve in such a short span of time. KDE has been involved with such mentoring programs since quite a while now but the enthusiasm, productivity and talent in the youth is something which still doesn't cease to surprise and awe the community members; same goes for all the participants who make KDE an integral part of their lives through such associations.

Another must read is the synopsis of the member activities around the globe - the Qt Developer Days in both Europe and US organized by John Layt and Carl Symons with Dario Freddi; respectively; the KDE EDU Sprint in October - which brought to light, discussion and loads of work - important issues such as KDE Frameworks 5/Qt Migration, math and language learning applications and many more such areas of focus. The KDEPIM Sprint in November has been covered in a fun and witty manner by Kevin Krammer and it is an article surely not to be missed in the report. A brief of the community events in France, primarily Akademy-fr in Toulouse and the occurrences at the event have been covered in another article.

For all those with a stronger affinity for numbers than letters; the finances for KDE e.V. for 2013 have been mentioned at the end.

The entire report can be found here.

Now since everything that was exciting for 2013 has been noted by you, a glimpse of what's in store for 2014 can be obtained here. The Randa Meetings 2014 is scheduled soon, 9th to 15th of August to be precise. We could strongly use your support in its organization.

Dot Categories:

KDE e.V. Quarterly Report for Q4 2013

KDE News - Jue, 06/19/2014 - 06:01

The KDE e.V. Quarterly Report for the fourth quarter of 2013 features a brief note of all the activities and events carried out, supported and funded by KDE e.V in this span of time, as well as a short overview of the major events, conferences and mentoring programs. !ll of this in one document that you should not miss out on to know about almost everything that has been KDE in those four months!

Contents

The featured article covers all the students of GSoC 2013 with personal quotes and a first-hand note of their experiences and time and an overview of each student's project and contributions followed by another article covering the young participants of Google Code-in and the massive feats that school children achieve in such a short span of time. KDE has been involved with such mentoring programs since quite a while now but the enthusiasm, productivity and talent in the youth is something which still doesn't cease to surprise and awe the community members; same goes for all the participants who make KDE an integral part of their lives through such associations.

Another must read is the synopsis of the member activities around the globe - the Qt Developer Days in both Europe and US organized by John Layt and Carl Symons with Dario Freddi; respectively; the KDE EDU Sprint in October - which brought to light, discussion and loads of work - important issues such as KDE Frameworks 5/Qt Migration, math and language learning applications and many more such areas of focus. The KDEPIM Sprint in November has been covered in a fun and witty manner by Kevin Krammer and it is an article surely not to be missed in the report. A brief of the community events in France, primarily Akademy-fr in Toulouse and the occurrences at the event have been covered in another article.

For all those with a stronger affinity for numbers than letters; the finances for KDE e.V. for 2013 have been mentioned at the end.

The entire report can be found here.

Now since everything that was exciting for 2013 has been noted by you, a glimpse of what's in store for 2014 can be obtained here. The Randa Meetings 2014 is scheduled soon, 9th to 15th of August to be precise. We could strongly use your support in its organization.

Dot Categories:

Agustín Benito Bethencourt: Abriendo puertas

Planet KDE Español - Jue, 06/19/2014 - 02:00
En un artículo anterior escribía acerca del fin de un ciclo personal y profesional para mi. Hoy escribo sobre la nueva aventura en la que me he embarcado.

Hace unos días me trasladé a Cambridge, la original y, a partir de ahora, la auténtica. :-) Me ha traído una nueva aventura profesional. Linaro ha tenido la gentileza de darme una oportunidad imposible de rechazar, como Director of Core Development. En próximos artículos comentaré en qué consiste.

Linaro es una organización sin ánimo de lucro creada por una serie de multinacionales con el objetivo inicial de convertir ARM en un ciudadano de primera clase dentro del Kernel Linux. Cuatro años despues de su fundación, el éxito de la organización en su misión original es claro (actualmente es el tercer contribuidor al kernel). Se trata ahora de alcanzar nuevos retos, además de insistir en los anteriores.

Así que tras una etapa en Nuremberg, capital mundial de la cerveza, y una corta estancia en Praga, una ciudad fantástica, inicio otro capítulo en un nuevo Reino. Agustin Benito Bethencourt (toscalix). Profesional del Software Libre, miembro de KDE España y KDE e.V.

KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): Mi Konqui Amigurumi adaptado para niños

Planet KDE Español - Mié, 06/18/2014 - 16:09

Entrada corta y concisa. Hace unos días recibí en mi caso un encargo muy especial, mi Konqui Amigurumi, el peluche de KDE creado por la empresa la Fábrica de Miritich.   Mi Konqui Amigurumi El hecho de que los Konquis Amigurimi, lospeluches KDE esten realizados a mano hace posible que se puedan realizar encargos personalizados y [&hellip

Randa Meetings Interview Two: Sanjiban Bairagya

KDE News - Mié, 06/18/2014 - 10:50

Sanjiban Bairagya

First and foremost we would like to thank everybody that already supported the Randa Meetings fundraising. We have reached almost 1/3 of the our goal. Please help more and spread the word. If we reach our goal we can have an even more stable Kdenlive, more applications ported to KDE Frameworks 5, further progress on Phonon, a look at Amarok 3, even better KDE educational applications, a finished port of GCompris to Qt and KDE technologies, an updated KDE Book, more work on Gluon and a new and amazing KDE SDK!

Here we are in conversation with Sanjiban Bairagya, a current Google Summer of Code 2014 intern who is working on Marble for KDE and is one of the younger, fresher, newer lots at KDE and has quite a bit to offer in terms of enthusiasm and brilliant ideas as well as zeal!

Could you describe yourself in a few lines and tell us where you're from?

I'm a B.Tech student of Information Technology studying in the National Institute of Technology, Durgapur, India. I am a FOSS enthusiast and have been contributing to KDE since April of last year, and have been selected for Google Summer of Code this year. I am currently working on implementing interactive tours in Marble, with Dennis Nienhüser and Torsten Rahn as my mentors.

How did you first chance upon KDE? Could you describe your journey in short?

KDE is seen very importantly in the university I study in. Some of my seniors before me have been working on KDE for a long time, and the juniors were told were told by them (I was a junior once) about the friendly and helpful nature of the community. So I also thought of giving it a shot and I started my "research" on KDE. I found it to be a really cool desktop environment to work in. After a few months of playing around, I came across this list of junior jobs in bugs.kde.org, so i started scrolling through them and wanted somehow to contribute to Marble since that was one software I did use regularly. And so I did. I just started solving bugs, one after the other. Then applied for GSoC this year, and got selected. Ah, just to mention, a few months before GSoC, we (me and a couple of more guys) even held a talk in our college, specifically about KDE. I spoke about Marble. Vedant spoke about Amarok, etc. Anyways, that's it. That's my "journey" (which is still ongoing) in KDE.

Why is KDE so special to you?

KDE is actually the most special thing to me. It gave me something nothing else could: a job related with real world software, with real world actual core developers. Plus, this global acknowledgement is simply amazing. In fact, I think that the single-most significant best thing which has happened to me at university was finding KDE. As I say to myself, "KDE gave me wings". I am just proud to be a member of a community so rich with knowledge, that I find myself kind of privileged to be in it.

When did you first hear about the meeting in Randa and why do you wish to be a part of it?

I was going through a conversation in #marble, where Mario had mentioned the term Randa to Dennis, asking him whether he will be going to it or not, so I asked Dennis whether this Randa thing was related to KDE in some way or not. And he said yes, and gave me the link, so that's how I got to know about it. I want to participate in it, firstly because Dennis is going there and I would love to meet him in person, and secondly, because I will be able to sit down and code away all day with so many more brilliant developers. Plus, I also heard (and I was going through the previous years' pics as well) that the folks have pretty good fun over there. So that is also one of the reasons. Mainly I want to go there for the experiences and the new things I will learn. I also have a few goals/points related to Marble as well, which I want to finish while I am there.

Which specific area of KDE applications do you contribute to? Could you describe it in short?

I contribute to an application under KDE Edu, called Marble. It is a virtual globe, with which you can view the planet Earth (and moon as well) in a humongously different number of ways, with different map themes, routes and directions, tracks, satellite maps, weather maps, temperature maps, precipitation maps and even historical maps. Whatever you need when it comes to maps is there.


Marble is a virtual globe and world atlas — your swiss army knife for maps.

What is your specific role in the particular group of KDE Applications that you are a part of and how long have you been working?

My role is just writing code like every other Marble developer out there. Right now I am working on my GSoC project. And I have been working on Marble since April, 2013.

Have you got anything in particular planned for Randa?

Yes, I will be working on Map theme tours on Marble (taking tours on different themes on Marble), implementing Gpsies services to Marble, and I am also planning on working on the QML or mobile part of Marble as well while in Randa.

What will you be looking forward to the most in the Randa Sprint? Any expectations or hopes of what it will be like?

I am looking forward to having a great time there in Randa, making new friends, meeting new people, and just keep learning more and more.

What does KDE mean to you and what role has it played in shaping you as a contributor/developer?

KDE means everything to me. It is the only thing which I have been this serious about. It sharpened my skills of object oriented programming, from A to Z. All thanks goes to none other than my mentor Dennis Nienhüser who has been patient enough to guide me thoroughly in this journey. All my contributions to KDE that I have been able to make so far, I owe to him. And I am very sure all the others in KDE are also as helpful as him.

Why do you think Meetings such as Randa are very important for KDE and for open source communities around the globe?

Meetings such as these, in my opinion, are very important, because these are the events, in which top developers get to discuss their ideas face to face, and come up with great plans, and then execute them. And all this happens within one week, which is really amazing. These meetings are very important for having a lot of progress, in a short duration of time.

Why do you think supporting them is of importance and how has the support helped you as a KDE developer and an open source contributor?

It is very important, since open source contributions should be increased more and more, so that people with ideas and skills, can get them executed, for free.

Could you briefly describe a rough outline of what you'd imagine your typical day in Randa this time around to be?

My typical day in Randa I would imagine, would start with some good food and then some coding, and then having some fun and hanging around. But, seriously, I don't even have the slightest idea. Which is what I am going to find out there.

Is this your first time to Switzerland? Are you excited about being in another country?

Not even Switzerland, this is actually the first time I am going to any country outside of India. In fact, it is only after knowing about Randa, that I applied for a passport. I am tremendously excited about this trip. I am pretty sure, that it's gonna be a hell of a bumpy ride. So, see you all in Randa then!

Thanks a lot, Sanjiban, for your time for the interview and dedication to Marble and the KDE community.

Please support us in the organization of the Randa Meetings 2014.

Dot Categories:

Randa Meetings Interview Two: Sanjiban Bairagya

KDE News - Mié, 06/18/2014 - 10:50

Sanjiban Bairagya

First and foremost we would like to thank everybody that already supported the Randa Meetings fundraising. We have reached almost 1/3 of the our goal. Please help more and spread the word. If we reach our goal we can have an even more stable Kdenlive, more applications ported to KDE Frameworks 5, further progress on Phonon, a look at Amarok 3, even better KDE educational applications, a finished port of GCompris to Qt and KDE technologies, an updated KDE Book, more work on Gluon and a new and amazing KDE SDK!

Here we are in conversation with Sanjiban Bairagya, a current Google Summer of Code 2014 intern who is working on Marble for KDE and is one of the younger, fresher, newer lots at KDE and has quite a bit to offer in terms of enthusiasm and brilliant ideas as well as zeal!

Could you describe yourself in a few lines and tell us where you're from?

I'm a B.Tech student of Information Technology studying in the National Institute of Technology, Durgapur, India. I am a FOSS enthusiast and have been contributing to KDE since April of last year, and have been selected for Google Summer of Code this year. I am currently working on implementing interactive tours in Marble, with Dennis Nienhüser and Torsten Rahn as my mentors.

How did you first chance upon KDE? Could you describe your journey in short?

KDE is seen very importantly in the university I study in. Some of my seniors before me have been working on KDE for a long time, and the juniors were told were told by them (I was a junior once) about the friendly and helpful nature of the community. So I also thought of giving it a shot and I started my "research" on KDE. I found it to be a really cool desktop environment to work in. After a few months of playing around, I came across this list of junior jobs in bugs.kde.org, so i started scrolling through them and wanted somehow to contribute to Marble since that was one software I did use regularly. And so I did. I just started solving bugs, one after the other. Then applied for GSoC this year, and got selected. Ah, just to mention, a few months before GSoC, we (me and a couple of more guys) even held a talk in our college, specifically about KDE. I spoke about Marble. Vedant spoke about Amarok, etc. Anyways, that's it. That's my "journey" (which is still ongoing) in KDE.

Why is KDE so special to you?

KDE is actually the most special thing to me. It gave me something nothing else could: a job related with real world software, with real world actual core developers. Plus, this global acknowledgement is simply amazing. In fact, I think that the single-most significant best thing which has happened to me at university was finding KDE. As I say to myself, "KDE gave me wings". I am just proud to be a member of a community so rich with knowledge, that I find myself kind of privileged to be in it.

When did you first hear about the meeting in Randa and why do you wish to be a part of it?

I was going through a conversation in #marble, where Mario had mentioned the term Randa to Dennis, asking him whether he will be going to it or not, so I asked Dennis whether this Randa thing was related to KDE in some way or not. And he said yes, and gave me the link, so that's how I got to know about it. I want to participate in it, firstly because Dennis is going there and I would love to meet him in person, and secondly, because I will be able to sit down and code away all day with so many more brilliant developers. Plus, I also heard (and I was going through the previous years' pics as well) that the folks have pretty good fun over there. So that is also one of the reasons. Mainly I want to go there for the experiences and the new things I will learn. I also have a few goals/points related to Marble as well, which I want to finish while I am there.

Which specific area of KDE applications do you contribute to? Could you describe it in short?

I contribute to an application under KDE Edu, called Marble. It is a virtual globe, with which you can view the planet Earth (and moon as well) in a humongously different number of ways, with different map themes, routes and directions, tracks, satellite maps, weather maps, temperature maps, precipitation maps and even historical maps. Whatever you need when it comes to maps is there.


Marble is a virtual globe and world atlas — your swiss army knife for maps.

What is your specific role in the particular group of KDE Applications that you are a part of and how long have you been working?

My role is just writing code like every other Marble developer out there. Right now I am working on my GSoC project. And I have been working on Marble since April, 2013.

Have you got anything in particular planned for Randa?

Yes, I will be working on Map theme tours on Marble (taking tours on different themes on Marble), implementing Gpsies services to Marble, and I am also planning on working on the QML or mobile part of Marble as well while in Randa.

What will you be looking forward to the most in the Randa Sprint? Any expectations or hopes of what it will be like?

I am looking forward to having a great time there in Randa, making new friends, meeting new people, and just keep learning more and more.

What does KDE mean to you and what role has it played in shaping you as a contributor/developer?

KDE means everything to me. It is the only thing which I have been this serious about. It sharpened my skills of object oriented programming, from A to Z. All thanks goes to none other than my mentor Dennis Nienhüser who has been patient enough to guide me thoroughly in this journey. All my contributions to KDE that I have been able to make so far, I owe to him. And I am very sure all the others in KDE are also as helpful as him.

Why do you think Meetings such as Randa are very important for KDE and for open source communities around the globe?

Meetings such as these, in my opinion, are very important, because these are the events, in which top developers get to discuss their ideas face to face, and come up with great plans, and then execute them. And all this happens within one week, which is really amazing. These meetings are very important for having a lot of progress, in a short duration of time.

Why do you think supporting them is of importance and how has the support helped you as a KDE developer and an open source contributor?

It is very important, since open source contributions should be increased more and more, so that people with ideas and skills, can get them executed, for free.

Could you briefly describe a rough outline of what you'd imagine your typical day in Randa this time around to be?

My typical day in Randa I would imagine, would start with some good food and then some coding, and then having some fun and hanging around. But, seriously, I don't even have the slightest idea. Which is what I am going to find out there.

Is this your first time to Switzerland? Are you excited about being in another country?

Not even Switzerland, this is actually the first time I am going to any country outside of India. In fact, it is only after knowing about Randa, that I applied for a passport. I am tremendously excited about this trip. I am pretty sure, that it's gonna be a hell of a bumpy ride. So, see you all in Randa then!

Thanks a lot, Sanjiban, for your time for the interview and dedication to Marble and the KDE community.

Please support us in the organization of the Randa Meetings 2014.

Dot Categories:

KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): Recaudaciones de fondos para proyectos KDE

Planet KDE Español - Mar, 06/17/2014 - 16:36

Hace un tiempo realicé un artículo titulado “15 formas de colaborar KDE (y el Software Libre en general)” en el que relataba justamente eso, diversas formas de ayudar al proyecto KDE sabiendo programar o no. La última de todas se centraba en la que ocupa menos tiempo pero es las más costosa económicamente hablando: realizar [&hellip

KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): Lanzado Linux Mint 17 Qiana KDE RC

Planet KDE Español - Lun, 06/16/2014 - 05:10

Una de las distribuciones que viene pegando fuerte en el ámbito de los usuarios es Linux Mint. Recientemente fue lanzado Linux Mint 17 Qiana KDE RC, es decir, la versión candidata definitiva de Linux Mint 17 en su versión escritorio KDE. ¿Quieres saber algo más de ella? Lanzado Linux Mint 17 Qiana KDE RC De esta [&hellip

KDE Commit-Digest for 4th May 2014

KDE News - Dom, 06/15/2014 - 12:46

In this week's KDE Commit-Digest:

  • KDE-PIM sees huge performance improvement for POP3 users with large maildirs
  • KAddressbook adds a category filter
  • Krita implements support for more types of palettes
  • Also in Calligra, Docx export filter has partial support for comments
  • Digikam sees work on better support of multicore CPUs with important performance improvements
  • Bluedevil has an initial port to KF5.

Read the rest of the Digest here.

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KDE Commit-Digest for 4th May 2014

KDE News - Dom, 06/15/2014 - 12:46

In this week's KDE Commit-Digest:

  • KDE-PIM sees huge performance improvement for POP3 users with large maildirs
  • KAddressbook adds a category filter
  • Krita implements support for more types of palettes
  • Also in Calligra, Docx export filter has partial support for comments
  • Digikam sees work on better support of multicore CPUs with important performance improvements
  • Bluedevil has an initial port to KF5.

Read the rest of the Digest here.

Dot Categories:

KDE Commit-Digest for 27th April 2014

KDE News - Dom, 06/15/2014 - 12:44

In this week's KDE Commit-Digest:

  • Umbrello adds find text in tree view, current diagram and all diagrams feature
  • KDE Telepathy can share images over common image sharing networks
  • Sflphone-kde adds security evaluation framework with GUI
  • Punctuation data is accessible to Jovie
  • Initial import of Application Menu aka (Homerun) Kicker
  • In IMAP-Resource, refactoring of retrieveitemstask introduces multiple improvements
  • Kexi is on the way to Qt5: Forms ported to Qt4's scroll area.

Read the rest of the Digest here.

Dot Categories:

KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): Minimalistic Clock – Plasmoides de KDE (51)

Planet KDE Español - Dom, 06/15/2014 - 02:42

Uno de los detalles que más me gustan del escritorio Plasma son la posibilidad de añadir funcionales extra con los plasmoides, estos son pequeñas herramientas que pueden hacer tu vida más fácil con solo ponerlos en tu escritorio Plasma KDE. Hoy os presento Minimalistic Clock , un reloj minimalista ideal para crear escritorios elegantes. Plasmoides [&hellip

KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): KDE Visual Design Group – primera quincena de junio

Planet KDE Español - Sáb, 06/14/2014 - 03:47

Se acerca la fecha. Las cosas se aceleran y aquí tenemos, con un poco de retraso, más noticias sobre el aspecto que tendrá el próximo Plasma Next. Bienvenidos al Informe “Semanal” de KDE Visual Design Group de la primera quincena de junio Los informes sobre el progreso del equipo de diseño de Plasma Next, es [&hellip

KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): 500 entradas de Victorhck in the free world

Planet KDE Español - Vie, 06/13/2014 - 16:55

En ocasiones los hados se confabulan en tu contra, y en otras a tu favor. Cierro una de las semanas laborales y familiares más complicadas de mi vida (nacimientos, complicaciones, evaluaciones, problemas de convivencia escolar, decisiones, aplazamientos, etc) lo cual me lleva a tener apenas tiempo para mantener el blog, lo cual, unido a las [&hellip

Randa Meetings Interview One: Cristian Oneț

KDE News - Vie, 06/13/2014 - 07:07

Cristian Oneț

This is one of our first interviews with the excited attendees of the Randa meetings and today you shall get a glimpse into the mind, workings and makings of Cristian Oneț who has been with KDE since quite some time now and has been a prominent contributor.

Could you describe yourself in a few lines and tell us where you're from?

My name is Cristian Oneț, I'm a software developer. I live in Timișoara, Romania. At my day job I work on developing/maintaining a suite of desktop applications on Windows (using Qt lately). I'm also a member of the KMyMoney development team.

How did you first chance upon KDE? Could you describe your journey in short?

My first contact with KDE was back in the 3.x days (I think it was 3.2). I was just starting to get familiar with Linux (first years at the Computer Science Faculty) and I was looking for a desktop that looked and felt good. KDE's workspace was my pick then and it stayed that way ever since.

Why is KDE so special to you?

It's the most visible part of my computer. By using it and contributing to its improvement it allowed me to grow as a developer. It feels good to be able contribute to something you find useful and to do it in a fun way.

Will this be your first time in Randa?

Yes it's my first time.

When did you first hear about the meetings in Randa and why do you wish to be a part of it?

I've heard about previous meetings in Randa from reading Planet KDE. I didn't really think that I'll ever participate but this year I was contacted by Mario Fux with the proposal to help port KMyMoney to KF5. After a short exchange of e-mails I decided that it would be nice to be there.

Which specific area of KDE software do you contribute to? Could you give a brief overview?

I'm a part of the team that develops KMyMoney the KDE personal finances manager application. I also had small contributions (mostly small patches) in other parts of KDE software (kdepim, kdelibs), most of these were fixes for problems that I encountered using KDE software or developing KMyMoney. Last but not least, I also contributed with Romanian translations since I believe that software should be properly internationalized.

As a KMyMoney developer one of the biggest task that I contributed to was porting it to KDE Platform 4. This was a great chance to get familiar with Qt's MVC programming. That period was one of the biggest wave of development on the project lately. After porting the application to KDE Platform 4 the port to Windows followed. That was also fun since I got to know some KDE Windows project members on the way.

How do you manage to balance your job and contribution to KDE?

I try to do both in a way that makes me happy with the work I'm doing. My KDE contribution can keep me happy as a developer which is not always possible at my job. There is also a limit to what I can do when it comes to contribution and if the time's consumed by my job I can't really contribute much. I'm usually productive as an Open Source contributor after my summer holiday. Contributions are also influenced by the feedback of the community and the development team. I find that it is usually easier to fix problems that effect a lot of people.

You work on the windows platform during your job and have an in-depth understanding of it. But you prefer to use Linux as your primary OS. Could you give us a few reasons why someone should make the switch to Open Source?

Yes, I always preferred Linux but that preference is pretty influenced by the way I relate to computers. I think that anyone who desires freedom of information should use Open Source, but of course, this is a disputable statement. The counter argument would be that one is only free if he has the knowledge and time to fix stuff that's broken. It's nice that the knowledge is out there but that does not really help somebody who just needs things to work.

I came a long way learning about computers by using Linux (Gentoo Linux that is) and I'm thankful for that. Still, I find myself once in a while after an update mumbling about some stuff that just broke because somebody thought it should be re-written from scratch. Not trying to send forth a wrong message, I know that there are problems on other platforms as well but on Linux they tend to be more frequent (probably caused by the faster release cycles). That's when the freedom to change stuff gets handy.

As a person who has been with KDE since his student days; what would your advice be to the students who are currently contributing to KDE to keep them motivated to continue development when they start working on a fully fledged job?

I would advise them to do what they enjoy doing. If they enjoy contributing to Open Source now then that probably won't change and they will keep doing it after they have a job. If they really enjoy Open Source they could be looking for a job on an Open Source project if they have the opportunity. Meeting the people they work with in Open Source could be also creating a kind of connection that would keep them contributing even when they have less free time in the future. Last but not least Open Source can be a kind of "escape" where one can really do the things they like when there is no such freedom at a job.


The Randa Meetings organizers use KMyMoney for their finances.

Since you are working on KMyMoney on both Windows and Linux could you describe the particulars of the development process in both and which one you prefer to work on?

I only developed KMyMoney on Linux, on Windows I only work on platform specific issues. But I can compare the two development platforms using the experience I have in C++ development on Windows at my job. My opinion is that except for the debugger; the tools on Linux are much more developer friendly. I use KDevelop, I love it's syntax highlighting, symbol navigation and documentation features but it still crashes once in a while (mainly while switching branches in Git). It's great to edit code but the integration with gdb does not seem so smooth as Microsoft Visual Studio's debugger. Code highlighting and navigation can also be improved on Windows with some add-ons. I have heard a lot about Qt Designer but I really like KDevelop and I can live with the debugger (it works 90 % of the time).

The KDE Platform is still pretty unstable on Windows and this was causing a lot of issues with the deployment once the application was ported. I guess this is caused by the fact that KDE software is mainly developed on Linux. The KDE on Windows team did a great job of trying to patch things to make them work on Windows but it seems it's hard to keep up with the pace KDE software is being developed. That's why, once we had our hands on a good KDE Windows release (that was 4.10.5 but it still needed custom patches), we stuck with it in the standalone installer that we provide. I would like KDE to focus on making the platform more stable than always looking at the next big thing in UI design.

I think that on Windows users only care about applications, if they would like to use the whole desktop they would definitely switch to Linux.

So the answer to your question is: I prefer to develop on Linux but I would also like the framework to be cross platform and so I would like to contribute to improve this situation.

Have you got anything in particular planned for Randa?

As I mentioned earlier hopefully I will be able to finish my task of porting KMyMoney to KF5 as well as meet KDE Windows project members, learn how KF5 will improve packaging on Windows and have fun while doing all that.

What will you be looking forward to the most in the Randa Sprint? Any expectations or hopes of what it will be like? Any particular people or projects you are looking to collaborate on/with in Randa? Any targets set on completing with respect to development?

The most interesting will be meeting the people that attend. I would start with some KDE Windows project members since I've been working with some of them while we ported KMyMoney to Windows. Packaging on Windows is still pretty hard so I would expect this to be improved. I would like to discuss about this and see if I could contribute since I'm at home in C++ development on Windows (it's my job).

What does KDE mean to you and what role has it played in shaping you as a contributor/developer?

It's my desktop of choice which I've been using for more than 10 years now. I really enjoy working with KDE/Qt as a developer since I think both have some of the most well designed API in the world of C++ frameworks/libraries. Since we use Qt at my job it was pretty useful to have previously worked with it.

Why do you think Meetings such as Randa are very important for KDE and for Open Source communities around the globe?

I've participated only once at a KDE related developer meeting. It was the KDE Finances Sprint in 2010. I felt that it was really nice that I could meet the people I was working with face to face. Such a meeting can create different kind of connections than an acquaintance using the usual (e-mail, irc) communication channels.

Why do you think supporting them is of importance and how has the support helped you as a KDE developer and an Open Source contributor?

Building on my previous answer I think that it's important to build well knit teams. People who meet in person work better together, at least that is the experience I've had while working on KMyMoney.  Our meeting gave the team a big boost so if KDE is to move forward at a good pace it needs to encourage and support developer meetings. As for me as a developer it was a real pleasure to get to know my colleagues who came from different parts of the world to see the similarities and the differences between us.

Could you briefly describe a rough outline of what you'd imagine your typical day in Randa this time around to be?

I guess it will be similar to the days we had at the KDE Finances sprint. After breakfast meetings, lunch then meetings again then some socializing over a beer in the evening.

Is this your first time to Switzerland? Are you excited about being in another country?

Yes, I've never been to Switzerland before, being able to visit it was one of the reasons I've decided to attend the meeting. At first I've declined since the period was overlapping with my family holiday but after I found out that it would be OK to spend a few days working at the meeting and the rest I could spend with my wife (we will be there together) I've decided to go.

Thanks a lot, Cristian, for your time for the interview and dedication to KMyMoney and the KDE community.

Please support us in the organization of the Randa Meetings 2014.

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KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): KDE lanza la segunda beta de Plasma Next

Planet KDE Español - Jue, 06/12/2014 - 14:39

Sigue el avance. el pasado 10 de julio se anunciaron las actualizaciones de la serie KDE 4.13 y 4.11, y  hoy me toca comentar los progresos en Plasma Next. La Comunidad KDE sigue avanzando. KDE lanza la segunda beta de Plasma Next El 10 de junio de 2014 fue anunciado el lanzamiento de la segunda [&hellip

Krita Kicks Off 2.9 Development Effort with a Kickstarter Campaign

KDE News - Mié, 06/11/2014 - 06:07

Krita Fundraiser on Kickstarter

Five years ago, the Krita team decided raise funds to raise Krita to the level of a professional applications . That fundraiser was successful beyond all expectations and enabled us to release Krita 2.4, the first version of Krita ready for professional artists!

Now, it’s time for another fundraiser, much, much more ambitious in scope! Dmitry Kazakov has worked full-time on Krita 2.8, and now we want him to work full-time on Krita 2.9, too. And it’s not just Dmitry: Sven, who has contributed to Krita for over ten years now, has recently finished university and is available as well.

So, we’ve setup a base goal that would cover Dmitry’s work, a stretch goal that would cover Sven’s work and a super-stretch goal that would cover porting Krita to the last remaining OS we don’t cover: OS X.

Since 2009, the Krita project has had three more sponsored projects, and all of them delivered: the Comics with Krita and Muses training DVD’s and Dmitry’s work on Krita 2.8. With Krita 2.4, Krita could be used by professional artists, with Krita 2.8, artists all over the world started taking notice and with 2.9, well -- we’ll make Krita irresistible!

Help us spread the word and make this campaign a big success!

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KDE Blog (Baltasar Ortega): Anulada – Plasma Active en las II Jornadas Libres

Planet KDE Español - Mié, 06/11/2014 - 03:34

¡Por razones ajenas a nuestra voluntad, queda anulada la Charla! En breve anunciaremos la nueva fecha. Disculpad las molestias  Las II Jornadas Libres del 2013-14 fueron presentadas el 7 de octubre en un acto sencillo en la UNED de Vila-real. Tras 14 charlas y  talleres llega al fin su segunda edición (la tercera está en [&hellip

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